(Source: durbikins)

seriousjones:

friendly reminder that

image

oneterabyteofkilobyteage:

original url http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Palace/3511/
last modified 1999-06-20 00:50:12

oneterabyteofkilobyteage:

original url http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Palace/3511/

last modified 1999-06-20 00:50:12

wwwtxt:

It remains my opinion that pretending to be an asshole on the net and actually being one are not as far apart as some people think. ☯94JUL

tralamander:

1978 JVC 3100R Video Capsule Television/Radio

tralamander:

1978 JVC 3100R Video Capsule Television/Radio

cognitivedefusion:

socialworkeroneday:

connect-the-dots-backward:


Hayes, S. C., Levin, M. E., Plumb-Vilardaga, J., Villatte, J. L., & Pistorello, J. (2013). Acceptance and commitment therapy and contextual behavioral science: Examining the progress of a distinctive model of behavioral and cognitive therapy. Behavior Therapy, 44(2), 180-198.

This. This. This.

so maybe I just need to read it a few more times to fully understand it. Or I’m just dumb. But
connect-the-dots-backward
what is this EXACTLY saying lol? I sorta get it. But I’m not content with my assumed understanding

"Feeling better" has not been found to lead to or cause getting better in functional ways (e.g., establishing relationships, pursuing a meaningful career, practicing health habits, etc.) It seems to be more the case that establishing those relationships and pursuing a meaningful career and practicing healthy habits leads to “feeling better.”
So engaging in those positive behaviors even when you don’t “feel” great or your symptoms are distressful is more important than simply getting to a place where you “feel better.”
Practicing healthy things when distressed > waiting until no longer distressed (if possible) and then practicing healthy things.

cognitivedefusion:

socialworkeroneday:

connect-the-dots-backward:

Hayes, S. C., Levin, M. E., Plumb-Vilardaga, J., Villatte, J. L., & Pistorello, J. (2013). Acceptance and commitment therapy and contextual behavioral science: Examining the progress of a distinctive model of behavioral and cognitive therapy. Behavior Therapy, 44(2), 180-198.

This. This. This.

so maybe I just need to read it a few more times to fully understand it. Or I’m just dumb. But
connect-the-dots-backward
what is this EXACTLY saying lol? I sorta get it. But I’m not content with my assumed understanding

"Feeling better" has not been found to lead to or cause getting better in functional ways (e.g., establishing relationships, pursuing a meaningful career, practicing health habits, etc.) It seems to be more the case that establishing those relationships and pursuing a meaningful career and practicing healthy habits leads to “feeling better.”

So engaging in those positive behaviors even when you don’t “feel” great or your symptoms are distressful is more important than simply getting to a place where you “feel better.”

Practicing healthy things when distressed > waiting until no longer distressed (if possible) and then practicing healthy things.

(Source: -clu-)

(Source: e--waste)

(Source: bewareofmpreg)

naominovik:

ursulavernon:

A friend requested I make this, and so here it is, and I offer it to anyone who needs it, with all the authority vested in me by whoever vests these things. Print it out if you need to.
The best art advice ever given to me—ever, ever—was “Don’t be afraid to make bad art.”
You will make a whole lot of crap in your time. Some will be truly awful and some will be merely mediocre. And that is totally normal and totally fine and for the love of little green apples, just keep going, because that’s the only way I know to get to the good stuff eventually.
(I normally feel horribly egotistical mentioning my awards, but I think this counts as using that power for good.)

I second this about a millionty.

naominovik:

ursulavernon:

A friend requested I make this, and so here it is, and I offer it to anyone who needs it, with all the authority vested in me by whoever vests these things. Print it out if you need to.

The best art advice ever given to me—ever, ever—was “Don’t be afraid to make bad art.”

You will make a whole lot of crap in your time. Some will be truly awful and some will be merely mediocre. And that is totally normal and totally fine and for the love of little green apples, just keep going, because that’s the only way I know to get to the good stuff eventually.

(I normally feel horribly egotistical mentioning my awards, but I think this counts as using that power for good.)

I second this about a millionty.